about
Information about Menorca
explore
Things to see and do
information
Information of general interest
Buscar
Ingles
 
Español Catalán Alemán Frances Italiano
  Minorca Talayotic - World Heritage Nomination
Bienvenidos
Menorca Cultural
Menorca tourism official website
 
Share:   Publicar en facebook  Publicar en twitter
 
The first set of walls was built around the old castle, the original centre of the city of Maó. Following the conquest of Menorca, the Catalans started to build the new walls on the orders of Pedro IV in 1359. They were made of stone and mortar and stood around 8 metres high and 1.5 metres wide with no embankment, a classic medieval wall. Inside, a narrow street followed the wall around the city. Bridge of San Roque The first set of walls was built around the old castle, the original centre of the city of Maó. Following the conquest of Menorca, the Catalans started to build the new walls on the orders of Pedro IV in 1359. They were made of stone and mortar and stood around 8 metres high and 1.5 metres wide with no embankment, a classic medieval wall. Inside, a narrow street followed the wall around the city. Gateways were set into the wall at intervals, allowing access to the city from the outside. Towers were also built along the length of the wall as part of the city defences. Read more
 

Bridge of San Roque

The first set of walls was built around the old castle, the original centre of the city of Maó. Following the conquest of Menorca, the Catalans started to build the new walls on the orders of Pedro IV in 1359. They were made of stone and mortar and stood around 8 metres high and 1.5 metres wide with no embankment, a classic medieval wall. Inside, a narrow street followed the wall around the city. Gateways were set into the wall at intervals, allowing access to the city from the outside. Towers were also built along the length of the wall as part of the city defences.


One of the entrances was the bridge of San Roque, which was also known as “Portal de Arriba” (the upper gateway) to differentiate it from the “Portal de Abajo” (the lower gateway) on Isabel II Street, and was the exit used for the road to Sant Climent and Ciutadella. This is the only surviving section of the wall. What you can see today are two square towers of different heights, with solid walls of stone and mortar with reinforcements of local “mares” stone (a limestone quarried on Menorca) and topped with machicolations. Between the towers, a passageway over the doorway allowed defenders to pass along the entire length of the wall. When the city began to spill over the confining walls, they lost their defensive power and the towers became living accommodation. Extensions were added to them and houses were built adjoining them. The site has recently undergone restoration work, which has removed a building from between the two towers and given them back their original appearance.

More information:

Location: Carrer Sant Roc y Plaça Bastió
Town: Mahón
Owned by: Maó City Council
Managed by: Maó City Council
Telephone: 971 369 800
Website: www.ajmao.org
Parking:
Hours: TOUR OF THE OUTSIDE


     
 
foto
 
 
THE WEATHER IN MENORCA
VIDEOS OF MENORCA
THE WEATHER IN MENORCA
FOLLOW US ON