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The sea plays an important role in shaping Minorca’s appearance. The island’s current profile is the result of centuries of moulding by the sea. The coastline was formed by sedimentation during different geological periods long gone by while seabeds emerged from beneath the water as the earth’s crust was folded and separated from continental coastline with plate tectonics. The Sea The sea plays an important role in shaping Minorca’s appearance. The island’s current profile is the result of centuries of moulding by the sea. The coastline was formed by sedimentation during different geological periods long gone by; while seabeds emerged from beneath the water as the earth’s crust was folded and separated from continental coastline with plate tectonics.
The force of waves during uncountable storms has carved the coast’s shape throughout centuries, devouring the rock where it was soft, to form coves and bays. In other places, the rock has stood strong against the force of the sea, leaving capes standing in solitude in a challenge to storms. Waves have also created beaches with fine sands as well as those with pebble stones. The force of storms has split cliff faces, ripping off pieces of rock that sank to the bottom of the sea creating very dangerous reefs for sailors.
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The Sea

The sea plays an important role in shaping Minorca’s appearance. The island’s current profile is the result of centuries of moulding by the sea. The coastline was formed by sedimentation during different geological periods long gone by; while seabeds emerged from beneath the water as the earth’s crust was folded and separated from continental coastline with plate tectonics.
The force of waves during uncountable storms has carved the coast’s shape throughout centuries, devouring the rock where it was soft, to form coves and bays. In other places, the rock has stood strong against the force of the sea, leaving capes standing in solitude in a challenge to storms. Waves have also created beaches with fine sands as well as those with pebble stones. The force of storms has split cliff faces, ripping off pieces of rock that sank to the bottom of the sea creating very dangerous reefs for sailors.


The sea’s role in the modelling the island’s coastline continues on far beyond the coast’s outline. Changes in the tides modify the island’s shape, increasing or decreasing the extension of island territory.
As a result of this, during the ice ages, when the dramatic increase in polar ice mass provoked a significant diminution of the ocean’s liquid mass, reduction in sea levels allowed the island’s area to expand. There were even times when the islands of Minorca and Majorca were joined into one unique territory, as the seabed on the channel which separates them is at most just 80 metres deep. Every time the sea level dropped by this amount, the two islands were joined together. Minorca’s coastal heritage includes many coastal caves, currently submerged. These were formed when the sea level was lower than today, and they were above water. Fossil dunes situated at the top of some cliffs are reminders of the opposite scenario. Far away from the sea now, these were formed when the sea level was higher than it is today.
The continuous change of the sea surface, mainly due to atmospheric thermal oscillations, has marked the general features of the island’s profile, with the continuous action of waves making final adjustments to the island’s profile.

 
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